mothernaturenetwork:

Asteroid hunting group says powerful asteroids strike Earth surprisingly oftenThe B612 Foundation seeks to raise awareness of the threats posed by asteroids, even those that burn up in the atmosphere or over uninhabited parts of the Earth.

mothernaturenetwork:

Asteroid hunting group says powerful asteroids strike Earth surprisingly often
The B612 Foundation seeks to raise awareness of the threats posed by asteroids, even those that burn up in the atmosphere or over uninhabited parts of the Earth.

Reblogged from Winter Child's Lair

Do you have a shorter name?

Reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr
n7positive:

[Caption: Shout-out to all Kaidan and Ashley fans who don’t let their love for one character get in the way of appreciating the other, and who tirelessly keep standing up for and defending them again and again. Just knowing that you guys are out there makes it all worth it. You all rock!]

n7positive:

[Caption: Shout-out to all Kaidan and Ashley fans who don’t let their love for one character get in the way of appreciating the other, and who tirelessly keep standing up for and defending them again and again. Just knowing that you guys are out there makes it all worth it. You all rock!]

Reblogged from Enkindle This:

bitchwhoyoukiddin:

seren-pen:

commanderderp:

lastofthetimeladies:

#Steve that’s a judging face #are you judging Tony #I think you are #just because he put his name on a building too doesn’t mean he wants to take over the world #Tony wouldn’t have any idea what the fuck to do with the world if he had it #he’d probably give it to Pepper

reblogging for he’d probably give it to Pepper

He’d totally give it to Pepper. 

And Pepper would give him the “…YOU ASSHAT.” face before taking it and running it better than it probably deserved. Honestly, Tony’s been accidentally training Pepper to run the universe since he hired her.  And it’s a testament to her awesome that she’s handled it.

Anyway, Tony is incredibly selfish and self-serving… until he isn’t.  Which usually happens pretty quickly.  I kind of get that?  I mean, I’m the same way, but on a much smaller scale.  I want something really bad (I NEED IT, I NEED IT), I work my butt off to find the ABSOLUTE BEST THING THAT IS of the thing I want, I save and scrimp and GET IT, and then two months later it’s usually sitting at the bottom of a drawer, or on a shelf, or I gave it to someone who it suited better.

Tony’s kind of similar?  I mean, just look at his art collection.  He kinda just… stored it, then gave it to the Boy Scouts of America because he was dying?  And while the “BECAUSE HE WAS DYING” thing was pretty prominent, he mostly just had it in storage?  I mean, Tony Stark as a character was supposed to be a bit of an amalgamation of Howard Hughes and William Randoph Hearst (as well as other famous million/billionaires during the 1960s, also BATMAN) and I find it interesting and a lot funny that in the movies he’s much more WRH?  And yeah, some of it comes out of the fact that IM established him as a West Coast billionaire dude, rather than an East Coast one, but the whole acquisition bent he has in the first film is very, very reminiscent of WRH.

Yeah, I lost the plot there.  HE WOULD TOTALLY GIVE THE WORLD TO PEPPER AND TRUST HER TO HANDLE THAT.  Then he’d run off to his batcave/lab and perfect desalinization or something.  Or, like, spend six weeks trying to figure out better Girl Scout cookie recipes.  Or figure out how to build and destroy Skynet.  Or, I dunno.  Build a starship.  Whatever.

Reblogged from A Work in Progress
amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote - Terry Southern
Reblogged from Amanda Patterson
Reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr

Ask An Author: “How do you bring humor into tense scenes without making light of a serious issue?”

lettersandlight:

image

Each week, a new author will serve as your Camp Counselor, answering your writing questions. Michael David Lukas, our final counselor, previously wrote for our blog about throwing a wrench into your revision routine, and is the author of historical novel The Oracle of Stamboul

How do you bring humor into tense scenes without making light of a serious issue? — Anonymous

Humor can be a great tool in novel writing. And, as the question implies, it can be especially useful as a way to break the ice in a scene with a lot of tension. Also, because humor relies on tension and the confounding of expectations, a middling to weak joke can pack an extra punch when delivered in a tense situation. But, before you go sprinkling jokes throughout all the serious conversations and violent confrontations in your novel, consider these three questions.

  1. Is it funny? Seems like a no brainer, but I often hold onto a bit of humor for sentimental reasons, even if it isn’t funny. Try reading the moment aloud to a friend (or even better a stranger) to see how they react.
  2. Does it serve the novel? Humor can move the plot forward, it can build a character’s personality, or it can relieve tension. But you want to make sure that you’re not just throwing a joke in there for no reason, even if it is funny.
  3. Is it consistent? If your character is making a joke, does the joke (and the context of the telling) fit the character’s personality? If the humor is situational (i.e. a clumsy detective fumbling with her gun in a standoff with the villain) does the humor fit the narrative voice? If the narrative voice is usually somber and serious, a joke at a tense moment might draw the reader out of the spell you’ve cast.

Humor is a great tool. But it’s important to think about how your humorous moments fit into the larger narrative arc, character building and/or narrative voice. If you can check all these boxes, you can be pretty sure you won’t be making light of a serious situation.

Don’t miss our #AskCampNaNo tweetchat with Michael and last week’s counselor, Patricia C. Wrede, this Thursday, 4/24/14, at 4 PM PST!

repair-her-armor:

poupon:

axl99:

ienjoyfewthings:

Dear anyone responsible for a work of fantasy fiction,

This is how you warrior.

UGH. YES. LADIES IN PROPER ARMOR.

The two watercolor ones are by Marian Churchland, who is THE BEST

the one with a reclining redhead is by Sang Han

From what I can tell, the rest are official art from various games.

I’m officially in love!

Reblogged from Diary of a Madwoman
Tags: female armor

Ways to Weaken Your Story from the Beginning

fictionwritingtips:

The beginning of your novel is super important and it shouldn’t be taken lightly. Planning out the first few chapters of your novel can be difficult, so I’ve come up with a list of things you should try to avoid. For the most part, pulling from this list will weaken your story. I know there are always exceptions, but I can almost guarantee you many publishers and agents are tired of seeing the same plot devices used over and over again.

So, here are a few ways to automatically weaken your story from the first few sentences:

Start with a long description of your character.

Sure, it helps your readers to have an image of your main character in their minds, BUT you don’t need to put the full description in the first paragraph. There might be a few things you want to mention, but try not to go beyond that until the opportunity presents itself. A full report is not necessary and it will drag your writing down from the beginning. Get creative with how you introduce your character and their appearance. What’s important? What do your readers absolutely need to know? Go with that.

Start with a dream.

I know this does work occasionally, but it happens so often I’m sure most people are sick of it. Starting your novel with a dream is no longer very creative and your readers will just want you to get to the point. However, if you do start with a dream make sure it ties the story together in some way and it’s not just boring story filler.

OR

Start with your character waking up.

This happens so often it’s crazy. It’s alright to begin your novel with something other than your character starting their day. In fact, it’s more exciting when it does. We don’t need to see what they do in the morning or read about them staring at their reflection in the mirror as they get ready for the day. You can start your novel where you want, so do something interesting.

Start with the weather.

Unless your story directly relates to the weather, please try to open your novel with something else. No one really cares about the weather that much, unless it’s some sort of apocalyptic awesome weather, so avoid it where you can.

Start with character emotions/thoughts.

“Where am I?” Amy thought. This is pretty boring. So is, “Amy was sad.” You’re already starting off your novel by telling your readers what your main character is thinking. We want to see it and experience it ourselves. You want to give your readers something to picture. The first sentence of your novel should be exciting and draw your readers in.

-Kris Noel

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Ngaio Marsh, born 23 April 1895, died 18 February 1982
Seven Quotes
Why do you want to become an author? I will accept only one answer. If it is because you feel you can write better than you can do anything else then go ahead and do it without frills and flourishes. Stick to your present job and write in your spare time: but do it as if it is a whole time job.
You must be able to write. You must have a sense of form, of pattern, of design. You must have a respect for and a mastery over words.
Please don’t entertain for a moment the utterly mistaken idea that there is no drudgery in writing. There is a great deal of drudgery in even the most inspired, the most noble, the most distinguished writing. Read what the great ones have said about their jobs; how they never sit down to their work without a sigh of distress and never get up from it witout a sigh of relief. Do you imagine that your Muse is forever flamelike — breathing the inspired word, the wonderful situation, the superb solution into your attentive ear? … Believe me, my poor boy, if you wait for inspiration in our set-up, you’ll wait for ever.
We worry and fumble and rehash. At two o’clock in the morning we get marvelous ideas and at eight o’clock the following evening we recognise those ideas for the nonsense they are. We have awful sessions when nothing goes right, and brief but blissful sessions when everything seems to go well.
We do not wait for inspiration. We work because we’ve jolly well got to. But when all is said and done, we toil at this particular job because it’s turned out to be our particular job, and in a weird sort of way I suppose we may be said to like it.
Above all things — read. Read the great stylists who cannot be copied rather than the successful writers who must not be copied.
You may be able to write a novel, you may not. You will never know until you have worked very hard indeed and written at least part of it. You will never really know until you have written the whole of it and submitted it for publication.
Marsh was a New Zealand crime writer who is best known for her creation Inspector Roderick Alleyn, a gentleman detective. She is known as one of the ‘Queens of Crime’ along with Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Margery Allingham.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Ngaio Marsh, born 23 April 1895, died 18 February 1982

Seven Quotes

  1. Why do you want to become an author? I will accept only one answer. If it is because you feel you can write better than you can do anything else then go ahead and do it without frills and flourishes. Stick to your present job and write in your spare time: but do it as if it is a whole time job.
  2. You must be able to write. You must have a sense of form, of pattern, of design. You must have a respect for and a mastery over words.
  3. Please don’t entertain for a moment the utterly mistaken idea that there is no drudgery in writing. There is a great deal of drudgery in even the most inspired, the most noble, the most distinguished writing. Read what the great ones have said about their jobs; how they never sit down to their work without a sigh of distress and never get up from it witout a sigh of relief. Do you imagine that your Muse is forever flamelike — breathing the inspired word, the wonderful situation, the superb solution into your attentive ear? … Believe me, my poor boy, if you wait for inspiration in our set-up, you’ll wait for ever.
  4. We worry and fumble and rehash. At two o’clock in the morning we get marvelous ideas and at eight o’clock the following evening we recognise those ideas for the nonsense they are. We have awful sessions when nothing goes right, and brief but blissful sessions when everything seems to go well.
  5. We do not wait for inspiration. We work because we’ve jolly well got to. But when all is said and done, we toil at this particular job because it’s turned out to be our particular job, and in a weird sort of way I suppose we may be said to like it.
  6. Above all things — read. Read the great stylists who cannot be copied rather than the successful writers who must not be copied.
  7. You may be able to write a novel, you may not. You will never know until you have worked very hard indeed and written at least part of it. You will never really know until you have written the whole of it and submitted it for publication.

Marsh was a New Zealand crime writer who is best known for her creation Inspector Roderick Alleyn, a gentleman detective. She is known as one of the ‘Queens of Crime’ along with Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Margery Allingham.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Reblogged from Amanda Patterson
georgialeflayart:

If Ashley gets James, then Kaidan should get Miranda. O^O
Happy fucking Valentines day.

georgialeflayart:

If Ashley gets James, then Kaidan should get Miranda. O^O

Happy fucking Valentines day.

Reblogged from sweet and bitter ✿

living400lbs:

deducecanoe:

jimthewebspinner:

deducecanoe:

i-come-by-it-honestly:

John Scalzi gets it.

This is what I have been trying to say in so many words—all men aren’t menaces to women, but all women have been menaced by men.

I think that is an important distinction to make. However, I do feel like it shifts the focus away from the men who are doing the thing a bit, and panders more to the whiny men who “aren’t like that!!!” more than necessary.

Regardless, I am so glad to see another guy taking a stand about this shit.

Oh it is total pandering to those ass-butts. But It’s the first thing you have to do is confront that bullshit. You have to have an answer for it. I got into a LONG fight with someone on Facebook about that very thing. I lumped all men into the “can’t be trusted until proven otherwise” category and got shit upon shit for it. From a gay man. I’m like wtf, man.

Note also what Molly Lewis put in: “And the point isn’t: ALL men are menaces to women.” The point is: “ALL women have been menaced by men.” 

Reblogged from Eyes Only