lhs3020b:

lukael:

*insert joke about how the salarians chest armor looks like a towel handle*

Always did wonder about what that handle was for…

(Actually I assumed it was a rescue thing, in case of injury or unconsciousness, but towel holder works too.)

I always thought it was a huge security risk, imagine being in close combat and someone just grabs that or attaches something to it. Tie salarian to a car, push car over cliff…

Common Writing Mistakes

Benjamin Dreyer is the VP Executive Managing Editor & Copy Chief of Random House Publishing Group. Below is his list of the common stumbling blocks for authors, from A to X. 

  • One buys antiques in an antiques store from an antiques dealer; an antique store is a very old store.
  • He stayed awhile; he stayed for a while.
  • Besides is other than; beside is next to.
  • The singular of biceps is biceps; the singular of triceps is triceps. There’s no such thing as a bicep; there’s no such thing as a tricep.
  • blond man, a blond woman; he’s a blond, she’s a blonde.
  • capital is a city (or a letter, or part of a column); a capitol is a building.
  • Something centres on something else, not around it.
  • If you’re talking about a thrilling plot point, the word is climactic; if you’re discussing the weather, the word is climatic.
  • cornet is an instrument; a coronet is a crown.
  • One emigrates from a place; one immigrates to a place.
  • The word is enmity, not emnity.
  • One goes to work every day, or nearly, but eating lunch is an everyday occurrence.
  • flair is a talent; a flare is an emergency signal.
  • flier is someone who flies planes; a flyer is a piece of paper.
  • Flower bed, not flowerbed.
  • Free rein, not free reign.
  • To garner is to accumulate, as a waiter garners tips; to garnish (in the non-parsley meaning) is to take away, as the government garnishes one’s wages; a garnishee is a person served with a garnishment; to garnishee is also to serve with a garnishment (that is, it’s a synonym for “to garnish”).
  • gel is a jelly; it’s also a transparent sheet used in stage lighting. When Jell-O sets, or when one’s master plan takes final form, it either jells or gels (though I think the former is preferable).
  • Bears are grizzly; crimes are grisly. Cheap meat, of course, is gristly.
  • Coats go on hangers; planes go in hangars.
  • One’s sweetheart is “hon,” not “hun,” unless one’s sweetheart is Attila (not, by the way, Atilla) or perhaps Winnie-the-Pooh (note hyphens).
  • One insures cars; one ensures success; one assures people.
  • Lawn mower, not lawnmower.
  • The past tense of lead is led, not lead.
  • One loathes someone else but is loath to admit one’s distaste.
  • If you’re leeching, you’re either bleeding a patient with a leech or otherwise sucking someone’s or something’s lifeblood. If you’re leaching, you’re removing one substance from another by means of a percolating liquid (I have virtually no idea what that means; I trust that you do).
  • You wear a mantle; your fireplace has a mantel.
  • Masseurs are men; masseuses are women. Many otherwise extremely well educated people don’t seem to know this; I have no idea why. (These days they’re all called massage therapists anyway.)
  • The short version of microphone is still, so far as RH is concerned, mike. Not, ick, “mic.” [2009 update: I seem to be losing this battle. Badly. 2010 update: I’ve lost. Follow the author’s lead.]
  • There’s no such word as moreso.
  • Mucus is a noun; mucous is an adjective.
  • Nerve-racking, not -wracking; racked with guilt, not wracked with guilt.
  • One buys a newspaper at a newsstand, not a newstand.
  • An ordinance is a law; ordnance is ammo.
  • Palette has to do with colour; palate has to do with taste; a pallet is, among other things, something you sleep on. Eugene Pallette was a character actor; he’s particularly good in the 1943 film Heaven Can Wait.
  • Noun wise, a premier is a diplomat; a premiere is something one attends. “Premier” is also, of course, an adjective denoting quality.
  • That which the English call paraffin (as in “paraffin stove”), we Americans call kerosene. Copy editors should keep an eye open for this in mss. by British authors and query it. The term paraffin should generally be reserved for the waxy, oily stuff we associate with candles.
  • Prophecy is a noun; prophesy is a verb.
  • Per Web 11, it’s restroom.
  • The Sibyl is a seeress; Sybil is Basil Fawlty’s wife.
  • Please don’t mix somewhat and something into one murky modifier. A thing is somewhat rare, or it’s something of a rarity.
  • tick bites; a tic is a twitch.
  • Tortuous is twisty, circuitous, or tricky; torturous is painful, or painfully slow.
  • Transsexual, not transexual.
  • Troops are military; troupes are theatrical.
  • vice is depraved; a vise squeezes.
  • Vocal cords; strikes a chord.
  • A smart aleck is a wise guy; a mobster is a wiseguy.
  • X ray is a noun; X-ray is a verb or adjective.

This week, it should be clear to this community that games are at a cultural turning point. […] More games are being created by more people for more people than ever before. Two groups are at opposite ends of this moment:

One side has folded its arms, slumped its shoulders while pouting like an obstinate child that has learned they are getting a little brother or sister but wants to remain the singular focus of his parents’ affection.

The other side has opened its arms, unable to contain its love and compassion, because they understand they are no longer alone.

This week, the obstinate child threw a temper tantrum, and the industry was stuck in the metaphorical grocery store as everyone was forced to suffer through it together. But unlike a child, the people behind these temper tantrums are hurting others. It’s time to grow up.

Reblogged from Hows ov Sekrits

ero-miki:

Putting down confident girls is not feminism

shaming sex workers is not feminism

"I’m not like other girls" is not feminism

slut shaming is not feminism

shaming BDSM practitioners is not feminism

misandry is not feminism

ignoring trans women’s rights is not feminism

Reblogged from Sexy Eagle
Tags: feminism

panicacidide:

Apparently it’s not socially acceptable for a man to invite another man out just for coffee or to go out for a meal, in case it’s perceived as a date. Like it’s fine if you wanna go to the pub and drink beer and have a chat but make it non-alcoholic and suddenly you’re not straight anymore? You can go to the cinema together but ONLY if it’s an action movie. You guys can’t even just go shopping with each other. Oh masculinity, so fragile, so strange. 

laryna6:

Just realized that the anti-abortion argument has a lot in common with anti-vaccers.

They’re both the products of ignorance, of a wealthy society that modern medicine has insulated from nature, from reality. 

One that doesn’t realize anymore that pregnancy kills. Not just childbirth: that pregnancy itself damages your body. That developing fetuses will strip-mine your organs, including your brain. That pregnancy and childbirth with those large brains and skulls is so taxing that female evolution for endurance has been the rate-limiting step on human evolution for intelligence, and we still had a spectacular rate of death in childbirth and death during pregnancy because that level of exertion

was still deadly for a species

that will run hundreds of miles for fun.

The female body exhibits humanity’s physical adaptations more strongly than the male body, our pelvises are different so bone spars don’t go anywhere that’ll make us bleed to death in seconds, our muscle tissue is built from the ground up to be able to power itself for hours, because it needed to be.

Deadly diseases are less common now, so people don’t see that pregnant women, already fighting to survive, have less to fight disease with. They don’t realize that reproduction has always been at the expense of the mother’s body. That it may be a price the mother considers worth paying, but it is one HELL of a price. It is not a free lunch.

And coming up short, not having the strength, means death. 

M-preg is impossible because male bodies are not built to survive that shit. Running hundreds of miles sure. Pregnancy? Childbirth? Out of their league. Those adaptations are expensive: men don’t have to be built that strong, so they aren’t.

The Puritans, the Puritans, who thought that sperm had souls, would allow anyone who wanted one to get an abortion, because well duh. Masturbation was evil, abortions weren’t, because masturbation was letting souls never be born for pleasure, while abortion saved lives. None of this ‘oh, damage to every organ in your body isn’t enough medical reason’ - pregnancy was an incredible strain on the body, heavy labor was also an incredible strain on the body, and deadly diseases happened. They believed that it was a woman’s duty to be fruitful and multiply, sure, but that meant picking when it was safest to do deadly shit, otherwise you’d be too dead to reproduce.

And of course modern society ignores that once upon a time, morality meant controlling penises, not just vaginas. 

Reblogged from Almost Here
Reblogged from Amanda Patterson

teacupwitch:

You know what baffles me?

Whiny Bioware fanboys saying “Video games shouldn’t be about ISSUES.”

But…Dragon Age has been about political issues and oppression from the very start. For example: the abuse of mages and city elves, the dubious morality of the Templars and the Chantry. Politics are the HEART of the Dragon Age series. They put all of these politically-charged issues in front of you and ask you to think about them and make decisions. 

But fanboys aren’t thinking about that. They’re just complaining that queer people are in the game. Romance is a VERY small portion of the game. So small that you can go through every single game without romancing anyone. And gay/bisexual characters have ALSO been there since the start.

It makes me wonder if these whiny-ass boys were even playing the same game I was.

Reblogged from AniDragon's Tumblr

calligraphicwaves:

If someone cheats on you they do not love you, remember that. If someone cheats on you they do not care about you as much as they say they do. If someone cheats on you it means that for a split second you were off their mind long enough for them to put another person in arms that should only be for you. If someone cheats on you, dear god, I hope you don’t go back to them because you are worth so much more than that.

lukael:

*insert joke about how the salarians chest armor looks like a towel handle*

bosswrex:swampwtch:swampwtch:"Well how about a giant sign that says ‘Don’t.’ You could hit people with it."i need this sign irlPlease, I need this so much

bosswrex:

swampwtch:

swampwtch:

"Well how about a giant sign that says ‘Don’t.’ You could hit people with it."

i need this sign irl

Please, I need this so much

Reblogged from A Work in Progress
Tags: seriously

Motivation: Moving Forward a Little Each Day

writing-questions-answered:

If you are a writer, and you have a novel idea that you are excited about writing, write it. Don’t go on message boards and ask random Internet denizens whether or not something is allowed. … Who is the writer here? YOU ARE. Whose book is it? YOUR BOOK. There are no writing police. No one is going to arrest you if you write a teen vampire novel post Twilight. No one is going to send you off to a desert island to live a wretched life of worm eating and regret because your book includes things that could be seen as cliché.

If you have a book that you want to write, just write the damn thing. Don’t worry about selling it; that comes later. Instead, worry about making your book good. Worry about the best way to order your scenes to create maximum tension, worry about if your character’s actions are actually in character; worry about your grammar. DON’T worry about which of your stylistic choices some potential future editor will use to reject you, and for the love of My Little Ponies don’t worry about trends. Trying to catching a trend is like trying to catch a falling knife—dangerous, foolhardy, and often ending in tears, usually yours.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t pay attention to what’s getting published; keeping an eye on what’s going on in your market is part of being a smart and savvy writer. But remember that every book you see hitting the shelves today was sold over a year ago, maybe two. Even if you do hit a trend, there’s no guarantee the world won’t be totally different by the time that book comes out. The only certainty you have is your own enthusiasm and love for your work. …

If your YA urban fantasy features fairies, vampires, and selkies and you decide halfway through that the vampires are over-complicating the plot, that is an appropriate time to ax the bloodsuckers. If you decide to cut them because you’re worried there are too many vampire books out right now, then you are betraying yourself, your dreams, and your art.

If you’re like pretty much every other author in the world, you became a writer because you had stories you wanted to tell. Those are your stories, and no one can tell them better than you can. So write your stories, and then edit your stories until you have something you can be proud of. Write the stories that excite you, stories you can’t wait to share with the world because they’re just so amazing. If you want to write Murder She Wrote in space with anime-style mecha driven by cats, go for it. Nothing is off limits unless you do it badly.

And if you must obsess over something, obsess over stuff like tension and pacing and creating believable characters. You know, the shit that matters. There are no writing police. This is your story, no one else’s. Tell it like you want to.

Rachel Aaron (via relatedworlds)

Yeah, so, this answers a lot of asks I get. It’s also why YW focuses on technique and style, and less on content and research.

(via clevergirlhelps)

The sign of intelligence is that you are constantly wondering. Idiots are always dead sure about every damn thing they are doing in their life.
— Vasudev